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The Moderating Effects of Fatalism and Traditionalism on Innovation Resistance

  • Nasir Salari
  • Eric Shiu
  • Tao Zhang
Conference paper
Part of the Developments in Marketing Science: Proceedings of the Academy of Marketing Science book series (DMSPAMS)

Abstract

This article highlights the importance of understanding the factors of innovation resistance towards discontinuous (or radical) innovations. Such innovations involve change for individuals, and resistance to change is an expected behaviour. This paper examines passive innovation resistance: a general willingness to resist innovations prior to new product evaluations. Previous literature emphasised the important role of culture and consumer personality in passive innovation resistance.

Building on previous conceptual models of innovation resistance, the authors empirically examined how two important cultural variables – traditionalism and fatalism – influence passive innovation resistance. To do this, data were collected from three countries in the Middle East from house owners contemplating adopting solar panels: a form of discontinuous innovation.

The results show the influence of the factors of consumer innovativeness (personality) and traditionalism (culture) on passive innovation resistance. Innovativeness showed the expected inverse influence; however, traditionalism exhibited a significant moderating role in the relationship between consumer innovativeness and innovation resistance. Fatalism was not found to have an influence contrary to previous studies.

Keywords

Innovation resistance Traditionalism Fatalism Culture Middle East Discontinuous innovations 

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Copyright information

© Academy of Marketing Science 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Bath Spa UniversityBathUK
  2. 2.University of BirminghamBirminghamUK

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