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The Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs? Agricultural Development in Latin America in the 20th Century

  • Miguel Martín-Retortillo
  • Vicente Pinilla
  • Jackeline Velazco
  • Henry Willebald
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Economic History book series (PEHS)

Abstract

In the last third of the nineteenth century, a large majority of Latin American countries adopted export-led models of growth, mostly based on agricultural exports. In some countries, this strategy produced significant results in terms of economic development but in most of the countries, the strategy was not successful, either because of too slow growth in exports or because linkages with the rest of the economy were very weak and there was no significant growth-spreading effect. After WWII, Latin America turned to a new model of economic development: the import substitution industrialisation (ISI). The ISI policies penalised export-led agriculture. The 1980s and 1990s were characterised by an expansion of adjustment policies and structural reforms. The new strategy consisted of mobilising resources in competitive export sectors, including agriculture. Chapter 13 analyses Latin America’s inability to get the maximum benefit from the changes that have occurred over this period.

Keywords

Latin American agriculture Economic development in Latin America Export-led models of growth Import Substitution Industrialisation (ISI) 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Miguel Martín-Retortillo
    • 1
  • Vicente Pinilla
    • 2
  • Jackeline Velazco
    • 3
  • Henry Willebald
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsUniversidad de Alcalá de HenaresAlcalá de HenaresSpain
  2. 2.Department of Applied Economics and Economic HistoryUniversidad de ZaragozaZaragozaSpain
  3. 3.Economics DeparmentPontificia Universidad Católica del PerúLimaPeru
  4. 4.Department of Economics, Universidad de la RepúblicaMontevideoUruguay

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