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National Context: Contemporary South African Capitalism, the State and Its Policy

  • Simone Claar
Chapter
Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of South African capitalism, the state and the national economic and trade policy. Firstly, the key characteristics of South African capitalism are outlined: racial discrimination over the centuries, a special type of colonialism and the accumulation regime known as the minerals–energy complex. Another characteristic is the relation between the state and the business in supporting specific capital classes as well as the current status of the South African economy. Secondly, the chapter provides an overview of policy trends in economic and trade policy like the Growth, Empowerment and Redistribution Programme and the Trade Policy and Strategy Framework. Recent political and economic developments, like the #feesmustfall movement, along with the weakness of the South African economy show the contemporary developments.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Simone Claar
    • 1
  1. 1.University of KasselKasselGermany

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