Geomorphologic Hazards in Egypt

Chapter
Part of the World Geomorphological Landscapes book series (WGLC)

Abstract

Geomorphologic hazards in Egypt could be divided into two groups: Earthquakes represent the first group, whereas fluctuations in Nile discharge, coastal erosion, flash floods, sand drift, storms, and dune movement represent the second group of hazards. Although annual fluctuations in Nile discharge and flood risk ceased after the construction of the Aswan High Dam, new hazards came into being due to the deposition of the Nile load in the basin of Lake Nasser. Among these are coastal erosion and retreat, and deprivation of the soils of the floodplain and the Delta from annual rejuvenation by the additions brought in by Nile floods. Flash floods and sand drift, storms, and dune movement are the most recurrent hazards in Egypt. Earthquakes are rather infrequent hazards in Egypt, but when they do occur some can be disastrous.

Keywords

Geomorphic hazards Nile fluctuations Lake Nasser Coastal erosion Flash floods Sand storms Dune encroachment Earthquakes 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Geography, Faculty of ArtsAin Shams UniversityCairoEgypt

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