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Delphi4Delphi: Data Acquisition of Spatial Cultural Heritage Data for Ancient Delphi, Greece

  • Ioannis Liritzis
  • George Pavlidis
  • Spyros Vosinakis
  • Anestis Koutsoudis
  • Pantelis Volonakis
  • Matthew D. Howland
  • Brady Liss
  • Thomas E. Levy
Chapter
Part of the Quantitative Methods in the Humanities and Social Sciences book series (QMHSS)

Abstract

For Digital Cultural Heritage, 3D modeling is an essential practice for the identification, monitoring, conservation, restoration, and enhancement of archaeological objects from artifacts to monuments. In this context 3D computer graphics can support archaeology and heritage policy, offering scholars a “sixth sense” for the understanding of the past, as it allows them to almost relive it. In addition, current trends for 3D video gaming (serious games) and scientific storytelling provide a variety of new approaches towards new, enhanced, and realistic experiences of the past. The research project “Digital Enterprise for Learning Practice of Heritage Initiative FOR Delphi” (Delphi4Delphi) targets most of these issues. In particular, it focuses on educational, research, and social implications of digital heritage, through the use of modern technologies such as digital optical documentation, geographical information systems and georeferencing, big data, video and interactive content production for education, virtual and augmented reality, cyber archaeometry, and Cyber-Archaeology. This chapter presents an overview of Delphi4Delphi in relation to the issues of acquisition, curation, and dissemination of spatial cultural heritage data.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The Delphi4Delphi project is ongoing. We thank the Ministry of Culture & Sports, Greece for granting permit on the D4D Project, initiated by IL University of the Aegean, in collaboration with Phokis Ephoria of Antiquities and the French School of Archaeology, Athens. Funding for the UC San Diego team was generously provided to Thomas E. Levy by Andrew Viterbi and the Viterbi Family Foundation (San Diego) and Norma Kershaw and the Kershaw Family Foundation (Orange County). Thanks also to Alina Levy for helping with the logistics of the Delphi4Delphi expedition.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ioannis Liritzis
    • 1
  • George Pavlidis
    • 2
  • Spyros Vosinakis
    • 3
  • Anestis Koutsoudis
    • 2
  • Pantelis Volonakis
    • 1
  • Matthew D. Howland
    • 4
  • Brady Liss
    • 4
  • Thomas E. Levy
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Mediterranean Studies, Lab of ArchaeometryUniversity of the AegeanRhodesGreece
  2. 2.Department of Product and Systems Design EngineeringUniversity of the AegeanSyrosGreece
  3. 3.ATHENA – Research and Innovation Centre in Information, Communication and Knowledge TechnologiesXanthiGreece
  4. 4.Department of Anthropology and Center for Cyber-Archaeology and Sustainability – Qualcomm InstituteUniversity of California, San DiegoLa JollaUSA

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