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Prostate Cancer Treatment and Related Psychosexual Sequelae

  • Sanchia S. Goonewardene
  • Raj Persad
Chapter

Abstract

The majority of men after radical prostatectomy, never regain preoperative levels of erectile function without further treatment [1]. This is due to the removal of prostate either damaging/removing nerves to the penis as part of prostate removal. Erectile function is compounded by an ageing physical function, and as a result worsening sexual function for men. A recent focus group study conducted with both men with psychosexual concerns found that sexual problems were associated with a variety of common physical adverse effects such as cardiovascular comorbidity [2]. Post radical therapy, there are side effects including reduced penile length, loss of desire, and loss of orgasmic satisfaction in the patient [1] all of which contribute to erectile dysfunction requiring psychosexual care.

The majority of men after radical prostatectomy, never regain preoperative levels of erectile function without further treatment [1]. This is due to the removal of prostate either damaging/removing nerves to the penis as part of prostate removal. Erectile function is compounded by an ageing physical function, and as a result worsening sexual function for men. A recent focus group study conducted with both men with psychosexual concerns found that sexual problems were associated with a variety of common physical adverse effects such as cardiovascular comorbidity [2]. Post radical therapy, there are side effects including reduced penile length, loss of desire, and loss of orgasmic satisfaction in the patient [1] all of which contribute to erectile dysfunction requiring psychosexual care.

References

  1. 1.
    Bober SL, Sanchez Varela V. Sexuality in adult cancer survivors: challenges and intervention. J Clin Oncol. 2012;30:3712–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Flynn KE, Jeffery DD, Keefe FJ, Porter LS, Shelby RA, Fawzy MR, Gosselin TK, Reeve BB, Weinfurt KP. Sexual functioning along the cancer continuum: focus group results from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS). Psychooncology. 2011;20:378–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sanchia S. Goonewardene
    • 1
  • Raj Persad
    • 2
  1. 1.The Royal Free Hospital and UCLLondonUnited Kingdom
  2. 2.North Bristol NHS TrustBristolUnited Kingdom

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