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Communication and Support

  • Sanchia S. Goonewardene
  • Raj Persad
Chapter

Abstract

Hanly et al., [1] although a moderate quality paper [2], did highlight other themes that need to be included in this systematic review [1] (n = 21). The themes of communication, between patient and partner, and also between health care professional and patient. The study can allow psychosexual issues to be identified and treated sooner. As part of the study, a peer support network e.g. prostate support group was central in managing psychosexual concerns (Level 2b, recommendation B). This has been previously demonstrated as an important part of prostate cancer survivorship care [3, 4]. Without this, patients may not be forthcoming about psychosexual concerns—this allows patients to be more open and forthcoming about their problems.

Hanly et al. [1] although a moderate quality paper [2], did highlight other themes that need to be included in this systematic review [1] (n = 21). The themes of communication, between patient and partner, and also between health care professional and patient. The study can allow psychosexual issues to be identified and treated sooner. As part of the study, a peer support network e.g. prostate support group was central in managing psychosexual concerns (Level 2b, recommendation B). This has been previously demonstrated as an important part of prostate cancer survivorship care [3, 4]. Without this, patients may not be forthcoming about psychosexual concerns—this allows patients to be more open and forthcoming about their problems.

In other cohort study, counselling Canada et al. [5] (n = 102) lead to improvement in psychosexual concerns and increased utilization of medical therapy. The study demonstrates the positive impact of good communication on the cohort (Level 2b, recommendation C) [5].

References

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    Hanly N, Mireskandari S, Juraskova I. The struggle towards ‘the New Normal’: a qualitative insight into psychosexual adjustment to prostate cancer. BMC Urol. 2014;14:56.CrossRefPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
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    Mays N, Pope C, Popay J. Systematically reviewing qualitative and quantitative evidence to inform management and policy-making in the health field. J Health Serv Res Policy. 2005;10:6–20.CrossRefPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Goonewardene SS, Nanton V, Young A, Makar A. The Worcestershire prostate cancer survivorship programme: a new concept for holistic long term care and follow-up. BJU Int. 2014;113:116–7.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Goonewardene SS, Persad R, Young A, Makar A. Re: Liam Bourke, Stephen Gilbert, Richard Hooper, et al. Lifestyle changes for improving disease-specific quality of life in sedentary men on long-term androgen-deprivation therapy for advanced prostate cancer: a randomised controlled trial. Eur Urol 2014;65:865-72. Eur Urol. 2014;66:e51–2.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Canada AL, Neese LE, Sui D, Schover LR. Pilot intervention to enhance sexual rehabilitation for couples after treatment for localized prostate carcinoma. Cancer. 2005;104:2689–700.CrossRefPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sanchia S. Goonewardene
    • 1
  • Raj Persad
    • 2
  1. 1.The Royal Free Hospital and UCLLondonUnited Kingdom
  2. 2.North Bristol NHS TrustBristolUnited Kingdom

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