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Staying Safe in Colombia and Mexico: Skilled Navigation and Everyday Insecurity

  • Helen Berents
  • Charlotte ten Have
Chapter

Abstract

In the context of shifting terrains of violence and insecurity, individuals in some communities in Colombia and Mexico have had to learn to adapt and try to stay safe in insecure environments. While simplistic narratives flatten the experiences of these individuals and communities, those who live there are sophisticated navigators of their social spaces (see Berents and ten Have, International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, 6(1), 103–117, 2017). In this chapter, we explore attitudes toward violence and insecurity in Colombia and Mexico, drawing on both ethnographic research conducted by the authors and publicly available large-scale surveys conducted in each country. Through this exploration, we argue that individuals are skilled navigators of terrains of violence and insecurity, acutely conscious of their capacity to avoid (or not) violence, and aware of broader social issues that cause insecurity and fear in their everyday lives.

Keywords

Colombia Mexico Violence Skilled navigation Insecurity 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helen Berents
    • 1
  • Charlotte ten Have
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Justice, Faculty of LawQueensland University of TechnologyBrisbaneAustralia

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