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Operationalizing Creativity: Developing Ethical Leaders Who Thrive in Complex Environments

  • Harry H. JonesIVEmail author
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Part of the Annals of Theoretical Psychology book series (AOTP, volume 15)

Abstract

In the interest of developing leaders who are both deeply ethical and highly creative, this essay explores the theoretical and practical links between ethics and creativity—two fields of research that are not often thought to have much to do with one another. Drawing on contemporary work both in philosophy and social psychology, I will argue that the notion of skill serves as one prominent theoretical link with substantial practical implications. This link comes with challenges, however. One major challenge suggests that situational factors are far more determinative of behavior than one’s character. A second challenge suggests that developing creative leaders could be at cross-purposes with developing ethical leaders. Accounting for these challenges, this essay offers ways one might develop virtuous and creative leaders. When developed together, virtue will provide both direction and limits to creativity, and creativity will support the development of practical wisdom. Ultimately, this essay aims to show how one might develop highly creative and deeply ethical leaders.

Keywords

Ethics Creativity Virtue Skill Moral decision-making Leadership Leader development Dishonesty Situationism Design thinking Creative problem-solving Empathy 

Notes

Disclaimer

The views expressed here are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy position of the United States Military Academy, the Department of the Army, the Department of Defense, or the US Government.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.United States Military AcademyWest PointUSA

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