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Seven Steps to Establish a Leader and Leadership Education and Development (LEAD) Program

  • Neil E. GrunbergEmail author
  • Erin S. Barry
  • Hannah G. Kleber
  • John E. McManigle
  • Eric B. Schoomaker
Chapter
Part of the Annals of Theoretical Psychology book series (AOTP, volume 15)

Abstract

Despite long-standing debates about whether leaders are born or made, current thinking within the leadership field is that leaders can be developed. In the arena of health and healthcare, developing effective, value-driven and outcome-focused leaders is critical to address the many challenges facing systems that promote and maintain health as well as focus on healthcare delivery and practices. Effective health and healthcare leaders are needed to set thoughtful policies; educate the public about primary prevention strategies; identify best practices (administrative and clinical); allocate healthcare resources wisely; address healthcare needs and disparities; focus on optimal clinical outcomes and value in the delivery of care; and encourage individuals to engage in behaviors that enhance well-being. This chapter presents seven steps to establish a Leader and Leadership Education and Development (LEAD) program. These steps were based on the authors’ experience establishing a LEAD program at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU) where physicians, advanced practice nurses, dentists, psychologists, and scientists are trained for the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Public Health Service, and civilians are trained to become scientists, academicians, and clinicians with a focus on national service and health. These same steps also could be used as a guide to establish programs that educate and develop leaders for other professions and careers.

Keywords

Leader development program Leader Education Medical school Military Framework 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The opinions and assertions contained herein are the sole ones of the authors and are not to be construed as reflecting those of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences or the Department of Defense. We thank LTC Matthew Clark for his valuable input.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Neil E. Grunberg
    • 1
    Email author
  • Erin S. Barry
    • 1
  • Hannah G. Kleber
    • 1
  • John E. McManigle
    • 1
  • Eric B. Schoomaker
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Military and Emergency MedicineUniformed Services University of the Health SciencesBethesdaUSA

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