Advertisement

The Social Evolution of Jurisprudence

  • Gavin Kennedy
Chapter

Abstract

Dugald Stewart reported on conversations he had with Adam Smith about his interest in the differences between human life in eighteenth Scotland compared to the lives of the native tribes in Africa and the Americas.

References

  1. Badley, R., and M. Edmonds. 2005. Interpreting the Ax trade: Production and exchange in Neolithic Britain. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Broadbank, Cyprean. 2013. The Making of the Middle Sea: A history of the Mediterarranean from the beginning to the emergence of the classical world. London: Thames & Hudson.Google Scholar
  3. Cannan, E. (ed.). 1896. Lectures on Justice, Police, Revenues and Arms delivered to the University of Glasgow by Adam Smith reported by a Student in 1869 and edited with an introduction and notes by Edwin Cannan, OUP.Google Scholar
  4. Cantillon, Richard. [1749] 2003. Essay on the Nature of Commerce in General, trans. Henry Higgs, with a new introduction by Anthony Brewer. New Jersey: Transaction Publishers.Google Scholar
  5. Ferguson, A. 1767. Essay on the History of Civil Society. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Kennedy. 2013. Adam Smith on Religion. In The Oxford Handbook of Adam Smith, ed. C. Berry, M. Paganelli, and C. Smith, pp. 464–484. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Morris, Desmond. 1967. The Naked Ape: A Zoologist’s Study of the Human Animal. London: Jonathan Cape.Google Scholar
  8. Ross, I.S. 2010. The Life of Adam Smith, 2nd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Stringer, Chris. 2011. The Origin of Our Species. London: Allen Lane.Google Scholar
  10. Turgot, R. A. [1776] (1973). Reflections of the Formation and Distribution of Riches, III. In Turgot on Progress, Sociology and Economics, trans, and ed. R. L. Meek, pp. 119–182. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.EdinburghUK

Personalised recommendations