Advertisement

Diversifying European Energy: Challenges of Securing Supply

Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Energy book series (LNEN, volume 60)

Abstract

A strategic aim of the European Union’s energy policy is to achieve long-term security of supply. The key for such supply security is long-term agreement achieved in solidarity with partners, particularly new partners who are able to promote both security and diversification of supply.

References

  1. Bentzen, J., & Engsted, T. (1993). Short- and long run elasticities in energy demand: A cointegration approach. Energy Economics, 15(1), 9–16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bernstein, M. A. & Griffin, J. (2006). Regional differences in the price-elasticity of demand for energy, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Report, no. NREL/SR-620-39512, http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy06osti/39512.pdf.
  3. Bros, T. (2012). European gas: On the verge of being spot indexed. Oxford energy forum, No:89 (pp. 3–4). Oxford, UK: Oxford Institute for Energy Studies, Oxford University.Google Scholar
  4. Dahl, C. (2004). International energy markets, understanding pricing, policies and profits. Tulsa: Penn Well.Google Scholar
  5. Devlin, B., Momot, M., & Tourbach, L. (2012). The southern corridor—Strategic aspects for the EU. Policy officers, DG energy, European commission. In J. A. Vionis (Ed.), EU energy law: The security of energy supply in the European union (Vol VI). Leuven: Claeys and Casteels Law Publishers.Google Scholar
  6. European Commission. (2010). Energy infrastructure package, COM (2010) 677 final.Google Scholar
  7. European Commission. (2011). Guidelines for tans-European energy infrastructure and repealing Decision No 1364/2006/EC, COM (2011) 658 final.Google Scholar
  8. FERC. (2012). Energy primer. A handbook of energy market basics. Washington: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. In Kjensjord, H. K. (2013) Liberalizing the European gas market: The role of network codes. Unpublished Master Thesis, 08.11.06.23 (3) KJEN, European Economic Studies, European integration and business, College of Europe, Brugge, Belgium.Google Scholar
  9. Gardner, A. (2013, July 4) Problems in the pipeline. European Voice, 11.Google Scholar
  10. Glachant, J. M., Hafner, M., De Jong, J., Ahner, N., & Tagliapietra, S. (2012). A new architecture for EU gas security of supply. European Energy Studies (Vol. 1), Leuven: Claeys and Casteels.Google Scholar
  11. Grigoryev, L., Tagliapietra, S., & Hafner, M. (2013). The role of the Russian federation in a globalizing gas market. European Energy Journal, 3(4), 53–64.Google Scholar
  12. Hafner, M., & Tagliapietra, S. (2013). Globalization of natural gas markets: New challenges and opportunities for Europe. Leuven: Claeys and Casteels Publishing.Google Scholar
  13. Hafner, M., & Tagliapietra, S. (2014). Turkey as a regional natural gas hub: Myth or reality? European Energy Journal, 4(1), 60–66.Google Scholar
  14. Hafner, M., & Tagliapietra, S. (2016). The future of european gas markets: Balancing act between decarbonisation and security of supply. Leuven: Claeys and Casteels Publishing.Google Scholar
  15. Hilbrecht, H. (2010). Europe’s new energy policy: Achievements and perspectives. In J. M. Glachant, N. Ahner, & A. De Hauteclocque (Eds.), (edn) EU Energy Law (Vol. V). EU Energy Law and Policy Yearbook, Leuven: Claeys and Casteels.Google Scholar
  16. Honoré, A. (2010). European natural gas demand, supply, and pricing: Cycles, seasons, and the impact of LNG price arbitrage. Oxford Institute for Energy Studies. NY: Oxford University Press Inc.Google Scholar
  17. Honoré, A. (2012). The gas exporting countries forum—Global or regional cartelization? In J. Stern (Ed.), The pricing of internationally traded gas. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  18. IEA. (2013a). Medium term gas market report 2013. Market trends and projections to 2018. France: International Energy Agency.Google Scholar
  19. IEA. (2013b). Resource to Reserves: Oil, Gas and Coal Technologies for the Energy Markets of the Future. OECD/IEA Publications 61 2012 08 1 P1, Paris.Google Scholar
  20. IEA/OECD. (1992). Politiquez et perspectives du gas naturel, Paris. Jonathan Stern, Third party access in European gas industries; and Peter Cameroon, gas regulation in Europe (Vols. I and II), London: Financial Times Energy Publishing.Google Scholar
  21. Kjensjord, H. K. (2013). Liberalizing the European gas market: The role of network codes. Unpublished Master Thesis, 08.11.06.23 (3) KJEN, European economic studies, European integration and business, College of Europe, Department of Economics, Brugge Campus, Belgium.Google Scholar
  22. Laursen, F. (2013). EU enlargement: Current challenges and strategic choices. Brussels: P.I.E. Peter Lang Publishing.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Levoyannis, C., & Labreche, M. (2013). The geopolitics of energy in the Eastern Mediterranean. European Energy Journal, 3(4), 46–52.Google Scholar
  24. Liu, G. (2004). Estimating energy demand elasticities for OECD countries: A dynamic panel data approach. Statistics Norway, Research Department Discussion papers no 373, http://www.ssb.no/publikasjoner/DP/pdf/dp373.pdf.
  25. Matalucci, S. (2014). The globalization of natural gas markets: New challenges and opportunities for Europe. Book Review, European Energy Journal, 4(2), 11–12.Google Scholar
  26. Mattucci, A. (2008). The internal market for gas: Proposals, economic evaluation and a possible scenario. Unpublished Mater Thesis, European Studies, College of Europe, Brugge, Belgium.Google Scholar
  27. NGSA. (2011). Industry and market structure. Natural Gas Supply Association. http://www.naturalgas.org/business/industry.asp%23overview. In Kjensjord, H. K. (2013). Liberalizing the European gas market: The role of network codes. Unpublished Master Thesis, 08.11.06.23 (3) KJEN, European economic studies, European integration and business, College of Europe, Brugge, Belgium.
  28. Noreng, O. (2014). Norwegian oil and natural gas: The outlook for production and exports. European Energy Journal, 4(2), 28–33.Google Scholar
  29. Platts. (2012). http://www.platts.com.
  30. Stern, J. P. (1984). International gas trade in Europe: The policies of exporting and importing countries. Hants: Gower Publishing Company Limited, UK.Google Scholar
  31. Stern, J. P. (2012). The pricing of internationally traded gas. Oxford Institute For Energy Studies, Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  32. Stern, J. P., & Rogers, H. (2013). The transition to hub based pricing in continental Europe—A response to Sergei Komlev of Gazprom Export. Oxford Institute for Energy Studies: Oxford Universtity, Oxford, UK.Google Scholar
  33. Tagliapietra, S. (2014). Energy infrastructure investments in Europe: The way forward. European Energy Journal, 4(2), 43–48.Google Scholar
  34. Vionis, J. A. (2010). The new rules and EU approach on energy security. In J. M. Glachant, N. Ahner, & A. De Hauteclocque (Eds.), (edn) EU energy law (Vol. V). EU Energy Law and Policy Yearbook, Leuven: Claeys and Casteels.Google Scholar
  35. Yorucu, V., & Bahramian, P. (2015). Price modelling of natural gas for the EU-12 countries: Evidence from panel cointegration. Journal of Natural Gas Science and Engineering, 24, 464–472. http://www.pipeline-journal.net/news/south-stream-20-tap-tanap-southern-corridor-na. Accessed on 04-05, 2016).
  36. Yorucu, V., & Katircioglu, S. T. (2014). Radioactive convergence of nuclear leakage in fukushima: Economic impact analysis of triple tragic events. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 35, 400–409.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EconomicsEastern Mediterranean UniversityFamagustaCyprus
  2. 2.Norman Paterson School of International AffairsCarleton UniversityOttawaCanada

Personalised recommendations