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The Third Sector’s Role in Managing Serious Offenders: Partners, Collaborators or Buffers?

Part of the Palgrave Studies in Risk, Crime and Society book series (PSRCS)

Abstract

This chapter will focus on the role of third-sector organisations in the management of sex offenders in the community. The chapter will consider, given the changing landscape of offender management, if the criminal justice system and third-sector organisations are working together or at cross-purposes.

Keywords

  • Third sector
  • Public protection
  • Sex offenders

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Notes

  1. 1.

    The term ‘third sector’ is used in this chapter even though it is not widely used outside of UK policy-making circles; ‘voluntary sector’ remains much more common in colloquial discourse. However, we prefer ‘third sector’ because this category includes mutuals and social enterprises, which are now as likely as charities to comprise the stratum of service providers. Additionally, the term ‘voluntary sector’ suggests that services are provided at a low cost and largely by volunteers (that is, unpaid helpers). The reality is rather different, especially as the risk management of sensitive client groups usually raises the professional, performative and legal standards required of the service provider.

  2. 2.

    Specifically, in its announcement, the ministry clustered several different types of surplus-making social enterprises to underline the suggestion that the successful contractors were not purely commercial interests: ‘Half of the partnerships chosen as preferred bidders also include new “mutual” organisations set up by current probation staff to take over their own organisations. The list of preferred bidders includes 16 charities and voluntary organisations, four probation staff mutuals and seven private companies, all with different expertise to bring to rehabilitation’ (Ministry of Justice 2014).

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Corcoran, M.S., Weston, S.K. (2017). The Third Sector’s Role in Managing Serious Offenders: Partners, Collaborators or Buffers?. In: McCartan, K., Kemshall, H. (eds) Contemporary Sex Offender Risk Management, Volume I. Palgrave Studies in Risk, Crime and Society. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-63567-5_8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-63567-5_8

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