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The Fallen Woman and Sexuality as “Their Own Weapon”: Victory, “Because of the Dollars,” and The Arrow of Gold

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Abstract

In Victory and The Arrow of Gold, Conrad addresses the figure of the fallen woman, considering the ways in which a male character’s acculturation to manhood entails a reductive, categorical view of womanhood, which the novels reject. Both novels place women in threatening sexual economies that reduce them to besieged erotic objects, and the heroines flee with sympathetic men to an Edenic refuge whose privacy temporarily allows for a more egalitarian and sexually liberated space. Yet this newfound liberty is undermined by aspects of the sexual double standard from which the women fled, and Conrad shows men and women to be subject to similarly destructive illusions about gender roles and the expectations they raise in relationships.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EnglishUniversity of South AlabamaMobileUSA

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