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Nutritional Contents and Analysis of Edible Wild Plants

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Edible Wild Plants: An alternative approach to food security

Abstract

Edible wild plants are economical, important, and good sources for vitamins, fibers, minerals, and antioxidants. These plants have curing ability for multiple disorders like cardiovascular problems, diabetes, digestive and urinary tract disorders, inflammation, etc. The conventionally utilized edible wild plants also possessed antibacterial and anticancer activity which adds value to their nutraceutical worth. In developing countries dependence on wild nutraceutical plant is quite customary. Numerous studies have explored the nutritional and medicinal worth of edible wild plants and reported the health potential ingredients (minerals, organic acids, and dietary fibers) among these plants [19, 20]. The results of their studies supported the fact that these wild fruits and vegetables are potentially viable sources for maintenance of health. Microelements in edible wild plants are significant in curing and preventing of multiple diseases. A small proportion of available plant minerals plays an important role in the maintenance of human body metabolism [26]. It has been found that Asian edible wild plants are worthwhile sources of natural antioxidants because they contain high amounts of phenolic compounds [25, 26]. The Sageretia theezans fruit studies revealed its nutritional and nutraceutical value. Its fruit is not only found to be rich in potassium, malic acid, and oleic acid but also showed antioxidant and antidiabetic competencies due to significant flavonoid and phenolic content [23].

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Shaheen, S., Ahmad, M., Haroon, N. (2017). Nutritional Contents and Analysis of Edible Wild Plants. In: Edible Wild Plants: An alternative approach to food security. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-63037-3_5

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