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Using Practitioner-Based Enquiry (PBE) to Examine Screen Production as a Form of Creative Practice

  • Phillip McIntyreEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

In order to understand creative practice, one firstly needs to understand the current research literature into creativity. We then have a basis for examining ways of researching creativity, particularly in relation to screen production. There are a number of possible research approaches. Using a framework that is common to all research, be it objectivist, subjectivist or constructionist, one could research screen production by taking a traditional research approach such as textual analysis or ethnography or by, instead, undertaking a creative practice research process while producing audio-visual material for the screen using a practitioner-based enquiry (PBE) approach. This chapter outlines the ontological and epistemological basis of PBE, describes and justifies its general use as a research tool to examine the creative process, outlines how it is used to research screen production as a specific form of creative practice, and finally, provides empirical examples of its application.

Keywords

Screen Production Practitioner-based Research (PBE) creativeCreative Practice Redvall Creative processCreative Process 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of NewcastleCallaghanAustralia

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