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The Software Design of an Intelligent Water Pump

  • Daniel Scott WeaverEmail author
  • Brian Nejmeh
Conference paper
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 741)

Abstract

In an effort to increase handpump reliability, the Messiah College Collaboratory and the Department of Computer and Information Science are developing the Intelligent Water Project (IWP) system. IWP measures and reports the functionality of handpumps and volume of water extracted on two-hour intervals daily. Additionally, IWP will measure groundwater levels which can be used to evaluate well yields. Data from handpumps is automatically collected and transmitted to a remote database. Once in the database, the data is analyzed and distributed to stakeholders via web and mobile applications and customizable alerts. Besides monitoring water extraction, handpump performance, and borehole health, the IWP system processes data to alert stakeholders of failure or degrading conditions (imminent failure). Coupled with appropriate field management processes, this information can lead to improved handpump availability and lowered cost of ownership. The key goal is to dramatically increase the reliability of handpumps. A secondary goal is the collection of handpump data from all IWP enabled pump sources providing a rich resource of data to enabling WASH practitioners, managers, hydrologist and donors to make more informed decisions. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the key IWP software design considerations and to discuss the key software design decisions made and the rationale for the same.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We acknowledge our hardware counterparts, Dr. David Vader and Anthony Beers along with various Computer Science and Collaboratory students for their work on this project.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Computer and Information ScienceMessiah CollegeMechanicsburgUSA

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