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Combining Theoretical Education and Realistic, Practical Training: The Right Approach to Minimize CBRNe Risk

  • Dieter RothbacherEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Terrorism, Security, and Computation book series (TESECO)

Abstract

CBRNe defense and its effectiveness depend on up-to-date education and realistic training programs. Such programs should allow confirmation through verification; therefore, they also require standards. CBRNe risks have been changing significantly over the last years, and such changes should be reflected in education and training programs. The combination of theoretical education and practical training is the best approach to minimize risks stemming from CBRNe materials and their malicious use. This article will analyze CBRNe education and training; more specifically, focus will be placed on both the theoretical education of First Responders and their realistic, practical training, including live agent training. How realistic does an education and training program have to be to counter current CBRNe risks? Is the use of CBR substances for training an essential element? And if so, can those substances be used safely for individual and/or collective training? According to the Author, realistic training can only be delivered when CBR materials are used; the benefits of combining theoretical education and realistic live agent training with CBR materials outweigh the related occupational risks, thus being essential parts of any effective CBRNE training program. Data from live agent trainings and their analysis will support this theory.

Keywords

CBRNe Training Didactic 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.CBRN Protection GmbHViennaAustria

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