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Augmentative and Alternative Communication and Autism

Chapter
Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

Intellectual disabilities and physical problems such as cerebral palsy are common among persons with ASD. These disorders further compound the communication issues inherent among persons with ASD. The development of electronics, particularly computers, has markedly accelerated developments in this area. This chapter such as augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems. AAC systems are defined and how these systems function in the environment is explained.

Keywords

ACC systems Communication Alternative methods of communication Augmentative and alternative communication ACC Pragmatic organization dynamic display 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Louisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA

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