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Social Skills Training for Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Keith C. Radley
  • Roderick D. O’Handley
  • Christian V. Sabey
Chapter
Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

Social skills training methods such as role-playing, modeling, performance feedback, and social stories have been used in group and individual therapies for decades. This chapter reviews these and other related methods, including manualized treatments that have been applied to children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder.

Keywords

Social skills training ASD Social deficits Treatment 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith C. Radley
    • 1
  • Roderick D. O’Handley
    • 1
  • Christian V. Sabey
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Southern MississippiHattiesburgUSA
  2. 2.Brigham Young UniversityProvoUSA

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