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Issues in Dementia Assessment Methods

  • Diana B. BurtEmail author
Chapter
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Abstract

Dementia assessment in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) is a challenging task, but past work by clinicians and researchers has improved diagnostic accuracy. Diagnostic criteria were outlined [1] and found to be feasible and useful [2–4]. Gradations from mild to major neurocognitive disorders were identified and found to affect dementia prevalence figures [5–7]. A battery of tests was proposed to identify significant declines [8, 9]. Ongoing investigations examined the sensitivity and specificity of tests from the proposed battery and additional alternative batteries [2, 3, 6, 10–25]. The purpose of this chapter is to outline and discuss general issues and factors that can affect dementia assessment either directly or indirectly [3, 11, 26]. Such issues are important to consider when evaluating tests for clinical and research purposes. As indicated in Table 2.1, a discussion of general theoretical issues will be followed by a more specific discussion of methodological issues.

Keywords

Dementia Assessment Major Neurocognitive Disorder Intellectual Developmental Disorder Dementia Status Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ConsultantMadisonUSA

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