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Overview of the Diagnostic Instruments for Dementia in People with Intellectual Disability

  • Maria Lusia Margallo-Lana
  • Stephen P. TyrerEmail author
  • Peter B. Moore
Chapter
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Abstract

According to the ICD-10 diagnostic guidelines [1], dementia is a disease of the brain, usually of a chronic or progressive nature, in which there is disturbance of multiple higher cortical functions, including memory, thinking, orientation, comprehension, calculation, learning capacity, language and judgment. Consciousness is not clouded. Impairments of cognitive function in dementia are commonly accompanied, and occasionally preceded, by deterioration in emotional control, social behaviour, or motivation. Dementia is a clinical diagnosis that requires evidence of cognitive decline sufficient to impair function in daily life over a period of at least 6 months [2].

Keywords

Informant Questionnaire On Cognitive Decline In The Elderly (IQCODE) Severe Impairment Battery (SIB) Dementia Screening Questionnaire Cambridge Cognitive Examination Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test (K-BIT) 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria Lusia Margallo-Lana
    • 1
  • Stephen P. Tyrer
    • 2
    Email author
  • Peter B. Moore
    • 3
  1. 1.Consultant in Old Age Psychiatry for people with Learning DisabilityMorpethUK
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryWolfson Research Centre, Newcastle UniversityNewcastle-upon-TyneUK
  3. 3.Queen Elizabeth HospitalGatesheadUK

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