Recapitulation and Final Thoughts

Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Audio-Visual Culture book series (PSAVC)

Abstract

The findings are recapitulated (Neoformalism is a fitting approach to treat music in films from a film scholar’s perspective and in a non-separatist way) and defended against potential criticism (Neoformalism being supposedly not interested in interpretation but only in descriptive analysis; Leonard Meyer’s theories being passé, Gestalt having being surpassed by Cognitivism).

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of SouthamptonSouthamptonUK

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