Film/Music Analysis II: Functions and Motivations of Music

Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Audio-Visual Culture book series (PSAVC)

Abstract

Film/Music analysis (one in which film music is analysed as to its close interaction with the other cinematic devices) is fully detailed. The types of motivations that music can have are explained and exemplified (realistic motivation, compositional motivation, transtextual motivation, artistic motivation, and economical motivation). The central point is the presentation of a set of functions that the analyst can direct her/his attention to when examining the agency of music in films (micro-emotive function, macro-emotive function, temporal-perceptive function, spatial-perceptive function, denotative cognitive function, and connotative cognitive function).

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of SouthamptonSouthamptonUK

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