Recent Attempts to Bridge the Gap and Overcome a Separatist Conception

Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Audio-Visual Culture book series (PSAVC)

Abstract

Some recent proposals are examined that have tried to move from a separatist conception (music and visuals are seen as separate entities) to a non-separatist conception (music and visuals are equal part in the audiovisual product), and others that have tried to build a bridge between Music Studies and Film Studies to find a common ground to tackle film music. The pros and cons of each proposal are articulated.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of SouthamptonSouthamptonUK

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