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Sedentary Behaviour and Ageing

Part of the Springer Series on Epidemiology and Public Health book series (SSEH)

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the prevalence and amount of sedentary behaviour in older adults with a range of functional limitations, distinguishing the differences between those who live independently with those who live in residential settings or who are subject to enforced sedentary behaviour, such as those in hospital. The associations of prolonged sedentary behaviour with both physical and mental health are less researched than in adults or children but show a clear pattern of reduced function, mental health, and longevity. Only a small number of interventions to reduce sedentary behaviour in older adults have been published, but the short-term benefits of such interventions appear to have positive outcomes to function. Clearly more work in this vulnerable population, especially in those transitioning to frailty, is warranted.

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Skelton, D.A., Harvey, J.A., Leask, C.F. (2018). Sedentary Behaviour and Ageing. In: Leitzmann, M., Jochem, C., Schmid, D. (eds) Sedentary Behaviour Epidemiology. Springer Series on Epidemiology and Public Health. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61552-3_13

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