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Multiculturalism in Video Game Studies: An Inquiry into the Current Research and Perspectives for Study

  • Agnieszka Kliś-BrodowskaEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Second Language Learning and Teaching book series (SLLT)

Abstract

The following chapter surveys a number of ways in which video games may be studied from the perspective of multiculturalism in a way that benefits both video game studies and studies in multiculturalism. It strives to locate the multicultural perspective of study with regard to the general field of video games research, stressing the cultural status of video games and the centrality of the notion of multiculturalism to their functioning. It familiarises the reader with an existing model for studying video games with cultural diversity in mind, and provides a brief review of two important sources that provide information on the current state of video game research: The Routledge Companion to Video Game Studies and a selection of texts from DiGRA’s digital library. In so doing it strives to highlight both the diversity of perspectives already taken on the multicultural aspect of games and their functioning in culture, and the pressing need for further research.

Keywords

Video games Multiculturalism Diversity Video game studies 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of English Cultures and LiteraturesUniversity of SilesiaSosnowiecPoland

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