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Is It Smart to Use Smartphones to Measure Illuminance for Occupational Health and Safety Purposes?

  • Diogo Cerqueira
  • Filipa Carvalho
  • Rui Bettencourt MeloEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 604)

Abstract

This study reports on the accuracy of smartphone-based illuminance measurement applications and whether they may be employed for occupational lighting measurements. A sample of nine mobile phones on three platforms (Android, iOS and Windows) was assembled and 14 apps were selected for testing. Testing conditions comprised four pre-specified illuminance levels (300 lx, 500 lx, 750 lx and 1000 lx) accomplished with three light sources presenting different Correlated Color Temperatures (2700 K; 4000 K; 6500 K). The results reveal extremely variable and sometimes large deviations from the reference levels and suggest smartphones are not appropriate for use in occupational lighting assessments.

Keywords

Light Measurement Applications Mobile phones Accuracy 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank those who volunteered their smartphones for testing.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diogo Cerqueira
    • 1
  • Filipa Carvalho
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rui Bettencourt Melo
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Laboratório de Ergonomia, Faculdade de Motricidade HumanaUniversidade de LisboaLisbonPortugal
  2. 2.CIAUD (Centro de Investigação em Arquitetura, Urbanismo e Design), Faculdade de ArquiteturaUniversidade de LisboaLisbonPortugal

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