Skip to main content

The Transformative Potential of CSR Discovery Leadership

  • Chapter
  • First Online:
CSR Discovery Leadership

Abstract

Swanson asserts that a sense of separation has kept a coherent theory of CSR leadership at bay. By disuniting business and society, it prevents these sectors from developing a shared consciousness of the values at stake in their interactions. Chapter 1 identifies the need for business executives to discard separation consciousness in favor of unity consciousness and the discovery mentality and values that make scientific inquiry possible. In this vein, the socially responsible executive must direct value-adept employees to discover, assess, and act on the constructive value expectations of stakeholders. This book delivers a “3S” approach to CSR leadership, because it focuses on the relationship between business and society and how executives can adopt the discovery mentality and values used in scientific inquiry to help create a sense of shared value consciousness between these two sectors. Swanson refers to this prospect as a “unified field of shared value consciousness.”

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this chapter

Chapter
USD 29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD 99.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Softcover Book
USD 129.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Compact, lightweight edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info
Hardcover Book
USD 129.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Institutional subscriptions

References

  • Bend, D., & King, A. (2014). Why consider a benefit corporation? Forbes. Retrieved from http://www.forbes.com/sites/theyec/2014/05/30/why-consider-a-benefit-corporation/#3295dd3b6ea3

  • Benefitcorp.net. Retrieved January 31, 2017.

  • Berman, M. (1981). The reenchantment of the world. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Berman, M. (1989). Coming to our senses: Body and spirit in the hidden history of the West. Seattle, WA: Seattle Writers’ Guild.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bird, F. B., & Waters, J. A. (1989, Fall). The moral muteness of managers. California Management Review, 32, 73–88.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Bornstein, D. (2007). How to change the world: Social entrepreneurs and the power of new ideas. New York, NY: Oxford.

    Google Scholar 

  • Butler, T. (2009). Plundering appalachia: The tragedy of mountaintop removal coal mining. San Rafael, CA: Earth Aware Editions.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, A. B., & Buchholtz, A. K. (2015). Business & society: Ethics, sustainability, and stakeholder management (9th ed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cone, C. (n.d.). Cause branding in the 21st century. PSA research center bibliography. Retrieved from http://www.psaresearch.com/causebranding.html

  • Cone Communications. (2015, May 27). Global consumers willing to make personal sacrifices to address social and environmental issues. [Press release]. Retrieved from http://www.conecomm.com/news-blog/2015-cone-ebiquity-csr-study-press-release

  • Cone Inc. (1999). 1999 Cone/roper cause related trends report: The evolution of cause branding. New York, NY: Cone.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cooperrider, D. L., & Whitney, D. (2005). Appreciative inquiry: A positive revolution in change. San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dees, J. G. (2001). The meaning of “social entrepreneurship”. Retrieved August 30, 2016, from https://entrepreneurship.duke.edu/news-item/the-meaning-of-social-entrepreneurship/

  • Deloitte. (2016). The Deloitte Millennial survey 2016. Retrieved from http://www2.deloitte.com/global/en/pages/about-deloitte/articles/millennialsurvey.html

  • Donaldson, T., & Preston, L. E. (1995). The stakeholder theory of the corporation: Concepts, evidence, and implications. Academy of Management Review, 20, 65–91.

    Google Scholar 

  • Drumwright, M. E., & Murphy, P. E. (2013). How advertising practitioners view ethics: Moral muteness, moral myopia, and moral imagination. Journal of Advertising, 33, 7–24.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Elkington, J. (1994). Towards the sustainable corporation: Win-win business strategies for sustainable development. California Management Review, 36, 90–100.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Elliott, S. (2014). Agencies set sights on marketing for a cause. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/11/business/media/agencies-set-sights-on-marketing-for-a-cause.html?_r=1

  • Etzioni, A. (1988). The moral dimension: Toward a new economics. New York, NY: The Free Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Frechette, H. (2010, July 21). Defining cause branding. Citizen Polity. Retrieved from https://citizenpolity.com/2010/07/21/544

  • Frederick, W. C. (1986). Toward CSR3: Why ethical analysis is indispensable and unavoidable in corporate affairs. California Management Review, 86, 126–141.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Frederick, W. C. (1992). Anchoring values in nature: Toward a theory of business values. Business Ethics Quarterly, 2, 283–303.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Frederick, W. C. (1994). General introduction: The elusive boundary between fact and value. Business Ethics Quarterly, 4, 111–112.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Frederick, W. C. (1995). Values, nature, and culture in the American corporation. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Freeman, R. E. (1984). Strategic management: A stakeholder approach. Boston, MA: Pitman/Ballinger.

    Google Scholar 

  • Friedman, M. (1962). Capitalism and freedom. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Friedman, M. (1970, September 13). The social responsibility of business is to increase its profits. New York Times Magazine, 33, 122–126.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ghoshal, S. (2003). B schools share the blame for enron: Teaching brutal theories leads naturally to management brutality. Business Ethics, 17, 4.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ghoshal, S. (2005). Bad management theories are destroying good management practices. Academy of Management Learning & Education, 4, 75–91.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Harris, J. D., & Freeman, R. E. (2008). The impossibility of the separation thesis. Business Ethics Quarterly, 18, 541–548.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Hollender, J., & Breen, B. (2010). The responsibility revolution: How the next generation of business will win. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jackall, R. (1988). Moral mazes. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jenkins, R. (2000). Disenchantment, enchantment and re-enchantment: Max Weber at the millennium. Max Weber Studies, 1, 11–32.

    Google Scholar 

  • Johnston, I. (2012, May 9). Study: Plastic in ‘Great Pacific Garbage Patch’ increases 100-fold. NBC News. Retrieved from http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/05/09/11612593-study-plastic-in-great-pacific-garbage-patch-increases-100-fold

  • Kampen, J. (2015). Emotional abuse and neglect in the workplace: How to restore normal organizational life. London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Keynes, J. M. (1923). A tract on monetary reform. London, UK: Macmillan.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kincaid, B. (2014). Big coal’s science experiment on West Virginians. MSNBC/20 Years, Melissa Harris-Perry/Green/Health. Retrieved from http://www.msnbc.com/melissa-harris-perry/the-science-experiment-west-virginia

  • Kuhn, T. (1970). The structure of scientific revolutions (2nd ed.). Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Marley, B., & Fox, S. (2014). A world-ecological perspective on socio-ecological transformation in Appalachian coal industry. American Sociological Association, 20, 257–280.

    Google Scholar 

  • Nielsen. (2015, October 10). Sustainable selections: How socially responsible companies are turning a profit. Retrieved from http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2015/sustainable-selections-how-socially-responsible-companies-are-turning-a-profit.html

  • Orlitzky, M., Schmidt, F. L., & Rynes, S. L. (2003). Corporate social and financial performance: A meta-analysis. Organizational Studies, 24, 403–441.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Orlitzky, M., & Swanson, D. L. (2008). Toward integrative corporate citizenship: Research advances in corporate social performance. London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Oster, E. (2014). Agencies increase focus on cause marketing. Adweek. Retrieved from http://www.adweek.com/news/advertising-branding/agencies-increase-focus-cause-marketing-158870

  • Park, C., & Koehler, D. A. (2013, May/June). A new era: Responsibility is on the rise—And shows no signs of letting up. Corporate Responsibility Magazine, 20–21.

    Google Scholar 

  • Richards, K. (2015, December 15). How agencies are meeting millennials’ demand for socially responsible marketing: Doing some good is good for business. Adweek. Retrieved September 6, 2016, from http://www.adweek.com/news/advertising-branding/agencies-are-carving-out-niche-socially-responsible-marketing-168592

  • Samuelson, J. (2011). The new rigor: Beyond the right answer. In M. Morsing & A. S. Rovira (Eds.), Business schools and their contribution to society (pp. 149–160). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • Scott, R. (2014, January 13). Giving at work: “Most dramatic shift we’ve ever seen.” Forbes. Retrieved from http://www.forbes.com/sites/causeintegration/2014/01/13/giving-at-work-most-dramatic-shift-weve-ever-seen/#4fb5808e606e

  • Smith, A. (1759). The theory of moral sentiments. London, UK: A. Miller.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Smith, A. (1776). An inquiry into the nature and causes of the wealth of nations. London, UK: W. Strahan.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Smith, V. (2008). Battle over coal mining gets a windy twist. Environment on NBC News. Retrieved from http://www.nbcnews.com/id/27363178/ns/us_news-environment/t/battle-over-coal-mining-gets-windy-twist/#.V4USsRKV-po

  • Sullivan, J. W. N. (1949). Limitations of science: A creative scientist’s approach to the unknown. New York, NY: Mentor Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Swanson, D. L. (1999). Toward an integrative theory of business and society: A research strategy for corporate social performance. Academy of Management Review, 24, 506–521.

    Google Scholar 

  • Swanson, D. L. (2004). The buck stops here: Why universities must reclaim business ethics education. The Journal of Academic Ethics, 2, 43–61.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Swanson, D. L. (2008). Top managers as drivers for corporate social responsibility. In A. Crane, A. McWilliams, D. Matten, J. Moon, & D. Siegel (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of corporate social responsibility (pp. 47–62). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Swanson, D. L. (2014). Embedding CSR into corporate culture: Challenging the executive mind. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Swanson, D. L. (2017). The restorative potential of discovery leadership: Corporate responsibility as participating consciousness. In R. Giacalone & C. L. Jurkiewicz (Eds.), Radical thoughts on ethical leadership (pp. 69–95). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

    Google Scholar 

  • Swanson, D. L., & Orlitzky, M. (2016). Toward a conceptual integration of corporate social and financial performance. In S. Diehl, M. Karmasin, B. Mueller, R. Terlutter, & F. Weder (Eds.), Handbook of integrated CSR communication (pp. 129–148). Berlin, Germany: Springer Publishing House.

    Google Scholar 

  • Visser, W. (2011a). The age of responsibility: CSR 2.0 and the new DNA of business. West Sussex, UK: John Wiley & Sons.

    Google Scholar 

  • Visser, W. (2011b). The nature of CSR leadership: Definitions, characteristics and paradoxes. CSR International Paper Series, 4, 1–10.

    Google Scholar 

  • Waddock, S., & Rasche, A. (2012). Building the responsible enterprise: Where vision and values add value. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Weber, M. (1947). The theory of social and economic organization (A. H. Henderson & T. Parsons, Trans.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. (Original work published 1922)

    Google Scholar 

  • Weber, M. (1958). The Protestant ethic and the spirit of capitalism (T. Parsons, Trans.). New York, NY: Scribner. (Original work published 1930)

    Google Scholar 

  • Weinstein, M. M. (1981). Some macroeconomic impacts of the national industrial recovery act, 1933–1935. In K. Brunner (Ed.), The great depression revisited (pp. 262–281). Boston, MA: Kluwer-Nijhoff.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • Whitehead, A. N. (1925). Science and the modern world. Great books of the Western World Series (Vol. 55). New York, NY: Macmillan Company.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wicks, A. C. (1996). Overcoming the separation thesis: The need for a reconsideration of business and society research. Business & Society, 35, 89–116.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, J. Q. (1989). Adam Smith on business ethics. California Management Review, 32, 59–72.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Worldwatch Institute. (2016, August 31). More businesses pursue triple bottom line for sustainably economy. Retrieved August 31, 2016, from http://www.worldwatch.org/more-businesses-pursue-triple-bottom-line-sustainable-economy-0

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2018 The Author(s)

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Swanson, D.L. (2018). The Transformative Potential of CSR Discovery Leadership. In: CSR Discovery Leadership. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-59954-0_1

Download citation

Publish with us

Policies and ethics