Disciples: Nation Building Modified (1967–1996)

Chapter
Part of the Sociology Transformed book series (SOTR)

Abstract

In time there emerged certain modalities of modernization theory, including revised functionalism, which, in the 1960s and 1970s, complemented the macrolevel approach with microlevels and mezzolevels of analysis. Another modality, revisited functionalism, has coped, since the late 1970s, with the fall of the house of Labor , and with the parallel fall of functionalist theory. The “late Eisenstadt” progressively distanced himself from his early Parsonian functionalism and elaborated a Weber ian cultural-civilization al orientation.

Keywords

Anthropology Center and periphery Dan Horowitz  Ethnography Moshe Lissak  Multiple modernities Revised functionalism Revisited Functionalism  

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyBen Gurion University of the NegevBeer ShevaIsrael

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