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The Mindfulness-Based Individualized Support Plan

  • Monica M. Jackman
  • Carrie L. McPherson
  • Ramasamy Manikam
  • Nirbhay N. Singh
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series on Child and Family Studies book series (SSCFS)

Abstract

In this chapter, we describe a field-tested model of service provision that is grounded in positive psychology, self-determination, and mindfulness, with an emphasis on growing the strengths of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. This model, the Mindfulness-Based Individual Support Plan (MBISP), is inclusive of supports for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, their family members, and paid caregivers. The MBISP provides a framework for providing supports to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities that respects and engages them in self-determination, enables preferences, and encourages choices that make life worth living. In essence, the MBISP includes the two key “interests” that make this possible: experiential interests—engaging in activities that one finds pleasurable and exciting—and critical interests—engaging in activities that give meaning to our lives. People with intellectual and developmental disabilities flourish when caregivers implement the MBISPs with wisdom, loving kindness, and compassion.

Keywords

Mindfulness Individualized support plans Mindfulness-based ISP Self-determination Preferences Choices Strengths Interests Experiential interests Critical interests Individuals with IDD Intellectual and developmental disabilities Treatment teams Supports Caregivers 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank service provider agencies and thousands of caregivers, supervisors, and executives who enabled us to develop and test the MBISP in many group homes and congregate care settings across several states. We also acknowledge with much gratitude our profound thanks to our many collaborators and enablers, especially Larry L. Latham, Theresa M. Courtney, Tabitha Burkhart, Warren Milteer, Connie Slaughter Van Bibber, Amy Dennison, Jerry Mallett, Lori Key, Priscilla Jimenez, Jodi Wilson‚ Brandy Chaneb‚ Hannah Burdette, and Paul Clark.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Monica M. Jackman
    • 1
  • Carrie L. McPherson
    • 2
  • Ramasamy Manikam
    • 3
  • Nirbhay N. Singh
    • 4
  1. 1.Little Lotus Therapy and ConsultingPort St. LucieUSA
  2. 2.College of Education and Human ServicesMurray State UniversityMurrayUSA
  3. 3.University of KentuckyLexingtonUSA
  4. 4.Medical College of GeorgiaAugusta UniversityAugustaUSA

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