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Introduction to Positive Psychology

  • Karrie A. Shogren
  • Michael L. Wehmeyer
  • Nirbhay N. Singh
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series on Child and Family Studies book series (SSCFS)

Abstract

This chapter offers an introduction to positive psychology. It provides a description of the history of deficit-based models in the psychology and disability field, the emergence of positive psychology as an alternative paradigm, and definitions of key terms and constructs in the field. It describes the alignment with emerging constructs in the disability field, providing a context for understanding and applying strengths-based approaches in intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Keywords

Positive psychology History Strengths Supports 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karrie A. Shogren
    • 1
  • Michael L. Wehmeyer
    • 1
  • Nirbhay N. Singh
    • 2
  1. 1.Beach Center on Disability/Kansas University Center on Developmental DisabilitiesUniversity of KansasLawrenceUSA
  2. 2.Medical College of Georgia Augusta UniversityAugustaUSA

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