Advertisement

Sorghum Grain Yield Under Different Rates of Mineral and Organic Fertilizer Application in the South-Sudan Zone of Burkina Faso

  • Idriss Serme
  • Korodjouma Ouattara
  • Dieudonné Ouattara
  • Souleymane Ouedraogo
  • Sansan Youl
  • Charles Wortmann
Chapter

Abstract

Soil fertility depletion has been recognized as the most important limitation to food security in Burkina Faso. Crop production eg sorghum is constrained by inadequate supply of fertilizers and there is therefore the need to establish optimum fertilizer rates for increased and sustainable yields. This study is a short-term experiment conducted during the 2014 cropping season on a Luvisol in the sub-sudanian zone of Burkina Faso. The experiment was laid out in a split plot, arranged in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Cattle manure (CM) at two rates (0 t ha−1 and 5 t ha−1) constituted the main plot whilst mineral fertilizer (kg ha−1) at eleven rates (0N-0P-0K, 40N-0P-0K, 60N-0P-0K, 40N15P-0K, 60N-15P-0K, 60N-7.5P-0K, 60N-22.5P-0K, 60N-15P-10K, 60N-15P-20K, 60N-15P-30K and 90N-15P-20K-15S-2.5Zn-10Mg-0.5B) constituted the sub-plots. The highest grain yield response was observed under sole application of 60 kg N ha−1 and 22.5 kg P ha−1. However, the yield obtained under these treatments was not significantly different from the grain yield observed under the applications of 40 kg N ha−1 and 15 kg P ha−1. Since lower N and P rates gave similar grain yield as the reference plot (90N-15P-20K-15S-2.5Zn-10Mg-0.5B), sole application of 60 kg N ha−1 and 22.5 kg P ha−1 can be considered as appropriate rate for optimum grain yield production. The interaction effect of cattle manure and mineral fertilizer did not significantly (P > 0.05) increase sorghum grain yield. The highest grain yield obtained in this case, was with the interaction between 5 t of cattle manure ha−1, 60 kg N ha−1 and 7.5 kg P ha−1 mineral fertilizer rates applied. No significant difference (P > 0.05) in sorghum grain yield was obtained above this fertilizer rate which can undoubtedly be suggested as the optimum rate. The Value Cost Ratio (VCR) of 2.01 and 2.23 obtained respectively under 60N-22.5P-0K and the interaction of cattle manure with 60N-7.5P-0K at the beginning of the wet season slightly exceeded the critical value of 2 required to motivate farmers to apply mineral fertilizer. Thus, fertilizer requirement for sustainable sorghum grain production at the study area in Burkina Faso is 5 t ha−1 of cattle manure combined with 60 kg N ha−1 and 7.5 kg P ha−1.

Keywords

Manure Mineral fertilizer Sorghum South Sudan zone 

References

  1. Bado, B., Cescas, M., Bationo, A., Sedogo, M., & Traoré, T. (2013). Influence of legumes on nitrogen (N) fertilizer recommendations for succeeding sorghum in the Guinea Savannah of West Africa. African Journal of Agricultural, 8, 6416–6421.Google Scholar
  2. Bationo, A., Nandwa, S., Kimetu, J., Kinyangi, J., Bado, B., Lompo, F., Kimani, S., Kihanda, F., & Koala, S. (2004). Sustainable intensification of croplivestock system through manure management in eastern and Western Africa: Lessons learned and emerging research approaches.Google Scholar
  3. Bationo, A., Vanlauwe, B., Kimetu, J., Kihara, J., Abdoulaye, M., Adamou, A., Tabo, R., & Koala, S. (2005). Increasing land sustainability and productivity through soil-fertility management in the West African Sudano-Sahelian zone. Nutrient and water management practices for increasing crop production in rainfed arid/semi-arid areas, 53.Google Scholar
  4. Bationo, A., Kihara, J., Vanlauwe, B., Kimetu, J., Waswa, B. S., & Sahrawat, K. L. (2008). Integrated nutrient management: Concepts and experience from SubSaharan Africa. In Integrated Nutrient Management for Sustainable Crop Production (pp. 467–521). New York: The Haworth Press, Taylor & Francis Group.Google Scholar
  5. Bationo, A., Hartemink, A., Lungu, O., Naimi, M., Okoth, P., Smaling, E., Thiombiano, L., & Waswa, B. (2012). Knowing the African soils to improve fertilizer recommendations. In Improving soil fertility recommendations in Africa using the decision support system for agrotechnology transfer (DSSAT) (pp. 19–42). Dordrecht: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bumb, B. L., Johnson, M., & Fuentes, P. A. (2011). Policy options for improving regional fertilizer markets in West Africa. International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Discussion Paper 1084.Google Scholar
  7. Dittoh, S., Omotosho, O., Belemvire, A., Akuriba, M., & Haider, K. (2012). Supporting policy research to inform agricultural policy in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Improving the effectiveness, efficiency and sustainability of fertilizer use in Sub-Saharan Africa. Briefing Paper.Google Scholar
  8. Henao, J., & Baanante, C. (2006). Agricultural production and soil nutrient mining in Africa: Implications for resource conservation and policy development. Muscle Shoals: IFDC- An International Center for Soil Fertility and Agricultural Development.Google Scholar
  9. Hernandez, M., & Torero, M. (2011). Fertilizer market situation. Market structure, consumption and trade patterns, and pricing behavior. Washington, DC: International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).Google Scholar
  10. Hien, V., Youl, S., Sanou, K., Traoré, O., & Kabore, D. (1992). Rapport de synthèse des activités du volet expérimentation du Projet Engrais Vivrier, 1986–1991. In Résultats agronomiques et évaluations économiques des formules d'engrais a moindre coût pour les céréales. Ouagadougou: INERA.Google Scholar
  11. Melenya, C., Logah, V., Aryee, D., Abubakari, A., Tuffour, H. O., & Yeboah, I. B. (2015). Sorption of phosphorus in soils in the semi deciduous forest zone of Ghana. Applied Research Journal, 1, 169–175.Google Scholar
  12. Opoku, A. (2011). Sustainability of crop residues and manure management in smallholder cereal-legume-livestock systems in the savannas of West Africa (p. 237). Ph.D thesis, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.Google Scholar
  13. Ouédraogo, E., Stroosnijder, L., Mando, A., Brussaard, L., & Zougmoré, R. (2007). Agroecological analysis and economic benefit of organic resources and fertiliser in till and no-till sorghum production after a 6-year fallow in semiarid West Africa. Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems, 77, 245–256.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Pervez, H., Ashraf, M., & Makhdum, M. I. (2004). Influence of potassium nutrition on gas exchange characteristics and water relations in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). Photosynthetica, 42(2), 251–255.Google Scholar
  15. Satyanarayana, V., Vara Prasad, P., Murthy, V., & Boote, K. (2002). Influence of integrated use of farmyard manure and inorganic fertilizers on yield and yield components of irrigated lowland rice. Journal of Plant Nutrition, 25, 2081–2090.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Smaling, E. M. A. (1995). The balance may look fine when there is nothing you can mine: Nutrient stocks and flows in West African soils. In H. Gerner & A. U. Mokwunye (Eds.), Use of phosphate rock for sustainable agriculture in West Africa. Proceedings of a seminar on the use of local mineral resources for sustainable agriculture in West Africa, held at IFDC-Africa from November 21–23, 1994.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Idriss Serme
    • 1
  • Korodjouma Ouattara
    • 1
  • Dieudonné Ouattara
    • 1
  • Souleymane Ouedraogo
    • 1
  • Sansan Youl
    • 2
  • Charles Wortmann
    • 3
  1. 1.Institut de l’Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles (INERA)OuagadougouBurkina Faso
  2. 2.International Fertilizer Development Center (IFDC)OuagadougouBurkina Faso
  3. 3.University of Nebraska-LincolnLincolnUSA

Personalised recommendations