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Introduction to the Happy Mind: Cognitive Contributions to Well-Being

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The Happy Mind: Cognitive Contributions to Well-Being

Abstract

Being happy consists of more than having the right things happen to us. It also depends on what we focus on, how we interpret the events of our lives, and what we are trying to achieve. Such considerations suggest that cognitive-emotional factors should play a fairly pronounced role in our levels of happiness and in changes in well-being over time. The present volume focuses on these cognitive-emotional contributions to well-being in the form of 24 chapters organized into 5 parts. The introductory chapter explains the rationale for the book, outlines its scope and organization, and provides an overview of the chapters to follow. The book generally focuses on factors that contribute to, rather than follow from, well-being and on factors that fit within a cognitive-emotional framework. However, it adopts a broad view of cognition, thus including chapters on the self, its goals, and social relationships in addition to more traditional cognitive elements such as attention and executive control. What results is a rich and diverse volume centering on the ways in which our minds can help or hinder our aspirations for happiness.

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Robinson, M.D., Eid, M. (2017). Introduction to the Happy Mind: Cognitive Contributions to Well-Being. In: Robinson, M., Eid, M. (eds) The Happy Mind: Cognitive Contributions to Well-Being. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-58763-9_1

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