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The UN Sustainable Development Goals and Neo-Colonialism

Part of the Contemporary African Political Economy book series (CONTAPE)

Abstract

The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) seek to put economic growth and private sector expansion back onto the agenda of African development. Goals 8 and 9, for instance, place great significance on the need for decent jobs and for infrastructure building to spur African prosperity. This chapter illustrates how the SDG’s pivot to economic growth and private sector development (PSD) represents a reinforcement of existing donor commitment to free market policies in Africa. Moreover, by focusing on sustainable development initiatives in the palm oil sector, and the EU-Africa Infrastructural Trust Fund (EU-AITF), the chapter queries whether poverty reduction is at the heart of donor (and corporate) strategies in the era of the UN SDGs. Again, Nkrumah’s concerns about neo-colonial trade and aid linkages appear pertinent for a current assessment of African ‘development’.

Keywords

  • Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
  • Nkrumah
  • Chapter Queries
  • Roundtable On Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO)
  • Priority Economic Sectors

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Langan, M. (2018). The UN Sustainable Development Goals and Neo-Colonialism. In: Neo-Colonialism and the Poverty of 'Development' in Africa. Contemporary African Political Economy. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-58571-0_7

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