Future Museum Experience Design: Crowds, Ecosystems and Novel Technologies

  • Arnold P. O. S. Vermeeren
  • Licia Calvi
  • Amalia Sabiescu
  • Raffaella Trocchianesi
  • Dagny Stuedahl
  • Elisa Giaccardi
  • Sara Radice
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series on Cultural Computing book series (SSCC)

Abstract

The museum world is rapidly changing from being collection-centred to being community-centred and for the public. Apart from broadening access to collections through, for example, digitisation initiatives, new ways of involving the public more meaningfully and at various levels have emerged. Experiences inside museums have become more engaging, by extending the experience beyond the physical visit, or by involving the public in various forms of crowdsourced stewardship of collections. In this book, we explore the design implications that go along with these developments, all concerned with diversifying and making the engagement of the public in museum experiences more rewarding. We focus on the design implications associated with museums reaching out to crowds beyond their local communities, on experimenting with novel technologies and on conceiving experiences embedded in connected museum systems and large institutional ecosystems. By looking at and reflecting on trends, we attempt to sketch a picture of how future museums will change and, particularly, how they will relate to their public as a result of responding to or embracing these trends.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the participants in the workshop ‘Involving the crowd in future museum experience design’ at CHI 2016 for their inspiring contributions, and their efforts to turn their position papers into chapters for this book. A special thank you to Anita Kreugel for proofreading parts of the book. We would like to thank as well Helen Desmond (Springer Nature) for the pleasant and fluent collaboration in the preparation of the book, and Dagny Stuedahl for initiating this process.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arnold P. O. S. Vermeeren
    • 1
  • Licia Calvi
    • 2
  • Amalia Sabiescu
    • 3
  • Raffaella Trocchianesi
    • 4
  • Dagny Stuedahl
    • 5
  • Elisa Giaccardi
    • 1
  • Sara Radice
    • 4
  1. 1.TU Delft - Industrial Design EngineeringDelftThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Academy for Digital EntertainmentNHTV - Breda University of Applied SciencesBredaThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Loughborough University LondonLondonUK
  4. 4.Department of DesignPolitecnico di MilanoMilanItaly
  5. 5.Department of Journalism and Media StudiesOslo and Akershus University College of Applied SciencesOSLONorway

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