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Infrequent Non-speech Gestural Activity Recognition Using Smart Jewelry: Challenges and Opportunities for Large-Scale Adaptation

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Handbook of Large-Scale Distributed Computing in Smart Healthcare

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Abstract

Wearable Body Area Network (BAN) based activity recognition is one of the fastest growing research areas in activity recognition and context reasoning. However, wearable physical sensor based Infrequent Non-Speech Gestural Activity (IGA) recognition is not well studied problem because IGAs are not directly observable from BAN sensor devices. Due to the recent proliferation of smart jewelries capable of monitoring locomotive and physiological signals from certain specific human body positions which are currently hitherto impossible to measure by traditional fitness and smart wristwatch devices opens up unprecedented research and development opportunities in anatomical gestural activity recognition. Inspired by this, we propose a new wearable smart earring based framework which is capable of differentiating IGAs in a daily environment with a single integrated accelerometer sensor. The natural gestures associated with the first portion of the human alimentary canal, i.e., human mouth can broadly be categorized in two types; frequent (talking, silence etc.) or infrequent (coughing, deglutition, yawning) gestures. Infrequent Gestural Activities (IGAs) help create an abrupt but distinct change in accelerometer sensor signal streams of an earring pertaining to specific activities. Mining and classifying the abrupt changes in sensor signal streams require high sampling frequency which in turn depletes the limited battery life of any smart ornaments. Extending the battery life of smartened designer jewelry requires probing those devices less which in turn prohibits of achieving high precision and recall for non-frequent gestural activity discovery and recognition. In this book chapter, we propose a novel data segmentation technique that harnesses the power of change-point detection algorithm to detect and quantify any abrupt changes in sensor data streams of smart earrings. This helps to distinguish between frequent and infrequent gestural acclivities at a high precision with a low sampling frequency, energy, and computational overhead. Experimental evaluation on one real-time and two publicly available benchmark datasets attests the scalability and adaptation of our techniques for both IGAs and postural activities in large-scale participatory sensing health applications.

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Acknowledgements

The work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation (NSF) under grants CNS-1344990, CNS-1544687, and IIP-1559752; the ONR under grant N00014-15-1-2229; Constellation: Energy to Educate; and the University of Maryland Baltimore-University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMB-UMBC) Research and Innovation Partnership grant.

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Alam, M.A.U., Roy, N., Gangopadhyay, A., Galik, E. (2017). Infrequent Non-speech Gestural Activity Recognition Using Smart Jewelry: Challenges and Opportunities for Large-Scale Adaptation. In: Khan, S., Zomaya, A., Abbas, A. (eds) Handbook of Large-Scale Distributed Computing in Smart Healthcare. Scalable Computing and Communications. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-58280-1_17

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-58280-1_17

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