Advertisement

What Government Policy Makers Need to Know About School-Based Counseling

Chapter

Abstract

Rationale and processes for adopting or adapting a government or agency sponsored model for school-based counseling are presented. Essential elements for favorable conditions for expanding a government- or agency-based model for school-based counseling are identified. A case study of a more than 20-year initiative in one state in the USA for implementing a highly successful model for school-based school counseling is presented. Conclusions include: It was essential to have a written state model of school-based counseling that promoted common understanding of the work of school-based counselors across the state and local levels. It was essential for the State Department of Education to pay careful attention to fostering favorable conditions for the development and expansion of school-based school counseling, and it was essential for the State Department of Education to use program evaluation to identify the tangible benefits of school-based counseling to the public good in order to leverage political and fiscal support from the legislature.

Notes

Acknowledgments

R. Lynn Jensen, for his early insights for and adoption of a comprehensive, developmental approach to school-based counseling; Dr. Norm Gysbers for providing the model and training for the development of the Utah CSCP; Norm Gysbers, C. D. “Curly” Johnson, and Robert Myrick for their role in the development of the ASCA National Model for School Counseling Programs; Judy Bowers and Trish Hatch for their leadership in developing the ASCA National Model; all the original members of the advisory group for the ASCA National Model for providing a professional learning community; Pat Martin for her 1998 presentation, “Acting As If You Really Cared about All Students,” and all that followed after it; Ian Martin, for his work on CSCP implementation and evaluation; Jay Carey, for his leadership in research and evaluation; and many other colleagues at the state, local government, and school level who work to make a difference for students every day.

References

  1. American School Counselor Association. (2003). The ASCA national model: A framework for school counseling programs (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: American School Counselor Association.Google Scholar
  2. American School Counselor Association. (2005). The ASCA national model: A framework for school counseling programs. Alexandria, VA: American School Counselor Association.Google Scholar
  3. American School Counselor Association. (2012). ASCA national model: A framework for school counseling programs (3rd ed.). Alexandria, VA: American School Counselor Association.Google Scholar
  4. Carey, J. (2009). A National Study of the current status of state school counseling models. Professional School Counseling, 12(5), 378–386.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Carey, J., & Harrington, K. (2010). Utah comprehensive counseling and guidance program evaluation report: A statewide evaluation of the Utah school counseling program. Amherst, MA: Center for School Counseling Outcome Research. School of Education.Google Scholar
  6. Fixen, D. L., & Blase, K. A. (2009). Implementation brief. National Implementation Research Network. Retrieved from http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED507422.pdf
  7. Gardner, J. L., Nelson, D. E., & Fox, D. G. (1998). Level of program implementation and pupil-counselor ratios with the comprehensive guidance program in Utah public schools. Salt Lake City, UT: Institute for Behavioral Research in Creativity.Google Scholar
  8. Jensen, L. (1995). How Utah got financial backing for comprehensive guidance. Vocational Education Journal. 70(5). Retrieved from https://www.questia.com/read/1P3-1876990/how-utah-got-financial-backing-for-comprehensive-guidance
  9. Kimball, J. C., & Gardner, J. L. (1995). The student educational and occupational plan and comprehensive guidance in Utah schools. Salt Lake City, UT: Institute for Behavioral Research in Creativity.Google Scholar
  10. Martin, I., Lauterbach, A., & Carey, J. C. (2015). The identification of factors affecting the development and practice of school-based counseling in different national contexts: A grounded theory study using a worldwide sample of descriptive journal articles and book chapters. International Journal for the Advancement of Counseling, 37, 305–318.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Nelson, D. E., & Gardner, J. L. (1998). An evaluation of the comprehensive guidance program in Utah schools. Salt Lake City, UT: Institute for Behavioral Research in Creativity.Google Scholar
  12. Nelson, D. E., Gardner, J. L., & Fox, D. G. (1998). Study II: Contrasts between students in high implementation and low implementation high schools in the Utah comprehensive guidance program. Salt Lake City, UT: Institute for Behavioral Research in Creativity.Google Scholar
  13. Nelson, D. E., Fox, D. G., Haslam, M., & Gardner, J. L. (2007). An evaluation of Utah’s comprehensive guidance program: The fourth major study of Utah’s thirteen-year program. Salt Lake City, UT: Institute for Behavioral Research in Creativity.Google Scholar
  14. Nemawashi-Decisions by consensus without compromise. (2009). Retrieved from http://blog.nayima.be/2009/06/19/nemawashi-decisions-by-consensus-without-compromise/
  15. Nemawashi-Toyota Production System Guide. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://blog.toyota.co.uk/nemawashi-toyota-production-system
  16. The Education Trust. (2011). Poised to lead: How school counselors can drive college and career readiness. Washington, D.C.: Education Trust.Google Scholar
  17. The Utah Model for Comprehensive Counseling and Guidance program adapted from: American School Counselor Association (2005). The ASCA national model: A framework for school counseling programs (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: American School Counseling Association.Google Scholar
  18. Utah Administrative Code. (2016). R277. Education, Administration. Retrieved from http://www.rules.utah.gov/publicat/code/r277/r277-462.htm
  19. Utah State Board of Education. (2016). Comprehensive counseling and guidance: Publications. Retrieved from http://www.schools.utah.gov/CTE/ccgp/Publications.aspx
  20. Utah State Legislature. (2015). Strengthening college and career readiness. Retrieved from http://le.utah.gov/~2015/bills/static/HB0198.html
  21. Utah State Office of Education. (2013). Comprehensive counseling and guidance program performance review: Connecting program improvement and student learning. Retrieved from http://www.schools.utah.gov/CTE/ccgp/DOCS/Review/ReviewNew.aspx

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Utah State Board of Education, University of PhoenixSalt Lake CityUSA
  2. 2.Draper Park Middle School, Canyons School DistrictSalt Lake CityUSA

Personalised recommendations