School-Based Counseling Policy, Policy Research, and Implications: Findings from Hong Kong and Japan

  • Mantak Yuen
  • Queenie A. Y. Lee
  • Raymond M. C. Chan
  • Shinji Kurihara
Chapter

Abstract

The chapter provides an overview of the existing policy landscape in Hong Kong and Japan. Key issues in school counseling are identified in each region, and the rationale underpinning policies for school-based counseling is discussed. The impact of policy on school practices is considered, and issues arising are identified. Relevant research findings are cited, and implications for future policy research considered.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The preparation of the chapter is partly funded by the Hong Kong Research Grant Council (HKU 756312).

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mantak Yuen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Queenie A. Y. Lee
    • 3
  • Raymond M. C. Chan
    • 4
  • Shinji Kurihara
    • 5
  1. 1.Faculty of EducationThe University of Hong KongPokfulam, Hong KongChina
  2. 2.Centre for Advancement in Inclusive and Special EducationThe University of Hong KongHong KongChina
  3. 3.Centre for Advancement in Inclusive and Special Education, Fauclty of EducationThe University of Hong KongHong KongChina
  4. 4.Department of Educational StudiesHong Kong Baptist UniversityHong KongChina
  5. 5.Graduate School of EducationHiroshima UniversityHiroshimaJapan

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