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Conducting Large-Scale Evaluation Studies to Identify Characteristics of Effective Comprehensive School Counseling Programs

  • Christopher A. Sink
  • Myya Cooney
  • Clara Adkins
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter explores and summarizes the key research methodological issues and considerations involved with the state-level evaluations of comprehensive school counseling programs (CSCPs) conducted in the USA, elucidating their commonalities and differences. Definitional and conceptual considerations are first reviewed, followed by a discussion of evaluation research as a critical tool to guide policymaking and implementation. Specific applications are then proffered in an attempt to illustrate and demonstrate the utility of these methodologies for generating knowledge and program policy. To conclude, recommendations to improve school counseling program evaluation research are included.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher A. Sink
    • 1
  • Myya Cooney
    • 1
  • Clara Adkins
    • 1
  1. 1.Old Dominion UniversityNorfolkUSA

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