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Development of a Tangible Learning System that Supports Role-Play Simulation and Reflection by Playing Puppet Shows

  • Hiroshi SasakiEmail author
  • Toshio Mochizuki
  • Takehiro Wakimoto
  • Ryoya Hirayama
  • Sadahide Yoshida
  • Kouki Miyawaki
  • Hitoki Mabuchi
  • Karin Nakaya
  • Hiroto Suzuki
  • Natsumi Yuuki
  • Ayaka Matsushima
  • Ryutaro Kawakami
  • Yoshihiko Kubota
  • Hideyuki Suzuki
  • Hideo Funaoi
  • Hiroshi Kato
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 10272)

Abstract

This paper describes the development of a tangible puppetry role-play simulation system called “EduceBoard”, which enables students to role-play, based on various character’s voices, in role-play simulation. It is to be noted that students are unable to play the diverse roles of children due to psychological inhibition and other factors in face-to-face self-performed role-play. EduceBoard is a tangible puppetry role-play simulation system that assists improvisational role-play, such as microteaching, by enabling students to play using puppets. It also provides web animation and comment functions for reflecting upon their play, recorded in a server. This paper describes the design specifications and implementation of the EduceBoard system, and discusses the current and future system applications.

Keywords

Role-play simulation Puppetry Computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) Real-world oriented user interface 

Notes

Acknowledgement

This work is supported by the JSPS KAKENHI Grants-in-Aids for Scientific Research (B) (Nos. JP26282060, JP26282045, JP26282058, and JP15H02937) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroshi Sasaki
    • 1
    Email author
  • Toshio Mochizuki
    • 2
  • Takehiro Wakimoto
    • 3
  • Ryoya Hirayama
    • 2
  • Sadahide Yoshida
    • 2
  • Kouki Miyawaki
    • 2
  • Hitoki Mabuchi
    • 2
  • Karin Nakaya
    • 2
  • Hiroto Suzuki
    • 2
  • Natsumi Yuuki
    • 2
  • Ayaka Matsushima
    • 2
  • Ryutaro Kawakami
    • 2
  • Yoshihiko Kubota
    • 4
  • Hideyuki Suzuki
    • 5
  • Hideo Funaoi
    • 6
  • Hiroshi Kato
    • 7
  1. 1.Information Science and Technology CenterKobe UniversityKobeJapan
  2. 2.School of Network and InformationSenshu UniversityKawasakiJapan
  3. 3.Faculty of Education and Human SciencesYokohama National UniversityYokohamaJapan
  4. 4.Graduate School of EducationUtsunomiya UniversityUtsunomiyaJapan
  5. 5.Faculty of HumanitiesIbaraki UniversityMitoJapan
  6. 6.Faculty of EducationSoka UniversityTokyoJapan
  7. 7.Faculty of Liberal ArtsThe Open University of JapanChibaJapan

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