The Poets of No Sure Place

Chapter

Abstract

Penfold sketches the increasingly complex nature of literary politics in post-apartheid South Africa. Beginning with the period immediately after transition, the chapter suggests a fall in literary standards occasioned by a recurrence of solidarity literature, a centralisation of publishing and a struggle to impose new critical perspectives. Penfold argues this situation has slowly improved. He turns to consider the rise of post-transitional literature and a new group of poets—The Poets of No Sure Place—who attack the current government and paint a hostile alternative picture of South Africa. The hopes of a utopian Rainbow Nation have died and been replaced by disillusion and uncertainty.

Keywords

Post-apartheid Transition Literary politics Poetry of No Sure Place Criticism 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of JohannesburgJohannesburgSouth Africa

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