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Black Consciousness and the Soweto Poets

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter explores the complexities and contradictions of Soweto Poetry as written by some of its leading voices: Mongane Serote, James Matthews, Njabulo Ndebele, and Sipho Sepamla. Penfold discusses their respective relationships to the English language and analyses their profoundly different poetic styles. In doing so, this chapter argues against the use of the term ‘anti-poetics’ when discussing Soweto Poetry. Penfold also examines how race and ideas of generational conflict are represented by each of these poets. He shows how these two topics support his initial claim that Soweto Poetry did not merely reflect Black Consciousness ideology but rather helped shape the movement’s thinking.

Keywords

Mongane Serote James Matthews Njabulo Ndebele Sipho Sepamla Anti-Poetics 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of JohannesburgJohannesburgSouth Africa

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