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Person-Centered Psychospiritual Maturation: A Multidimensional Model

  • Jared D. KassEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This conceptual chapter presents a multidimensional model of person-centered psychospiritual maturation. It describes five dimensions of self that can be dysregulated by humanity’s chain of pain: bio-behavioral, cognitive-sociocultural, social-emotional, existential-spiritual, and integrative worldview formation. It further presents and discusses person-centered psychospiritual maturation as an antidote to these dysregulating effects. In addition, the chapter examines the human capacity for person-centered psychospiritual maturation as an emergent phenomenon of bio-cultural evolution.

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  1. 1.ConcordUSA

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