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Higher Education: Model for Constructive Change? Or Mirror of Humanity’s Chain of Pain?

  • Jared D. KassEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter examines a critical issue in post-secondary education. We have achieved unparalleled success as an engine for technological innovation, professional career development, and the advancement of knowledge. However, since Ernest Boyer ’s investigation of the college experience and subsequent report, Campus Life: In Search of Community, it has been evident that “the idyllic vision so routinely portrayed in college promotional materials often masks disturbing realities of student life” (p. 3). Boyer found students to be disengaged from intellectual work. Further, many experienced psychological and behavioral dysregulation that undermined their academic success and a positive campus culture. This chapter reviews research documenting these persistent problems, suggesting that higher education has become a mirror of humanity’s chain of pain. It then reviews efforts to rectify these issues through engaged teaching and learning, documenting limited success using current methods. Finally, it explains how a person-centered approach to engaged learning, which mentors psychospiritual maturation in students, may offer a more effective response to these issues.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ConcordUSA

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