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Person-Centered Psychospiritual Maturation: Strengthening Campus Cultures of Health, Social Justice, and Peace

Implications for Engaged Learning in Higher Education-
  • Jared D. KassEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This concluding chapter discusses person-centered psychospiritual maturation as a learning process that can strengthen campus cultures of health, social justice, and peace. It reviews behavioral dysregulation, psychological distress, and lack of cohesive community on our campuses, as well as the failure of current engaged learning practices to solve these problems. It frames these problems through the lens of humanistic psychology, viewing them as evidence that higher education has become a mirror of systemic forces that fuel humanity’s chain of pain. Based on results reported in Chapter 12, it suggests that these issues can be addressed more effectively by mentoring undergraduate and entry-level graduate students in a person-centered, nonsectarian approach to psychospiritual maturation within culturally inclusive learning communities. It reviews the five dimensions of psychospiritual maturation and discusses how faculty and student life professionals can integrate this learning process into the core curriculum and co-curricular activities.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ConcordUSA

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