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Hysteroscopy pp 683-687 | Cite as

Endometrial Osseous Metaplasia

  • Enric Cayuela
  • Josep Vilanova
  • María del Río
  • Federico Heredia
  • Laura Acín
  • Patricia Zarco
  • Natalia Giraldo
  • Estefania Llanos
Chapter

Abstract

Bone metaplasia of the endometrium is an uncommon entity characterized by the presence of fragments of mature bone in the endometrium. Without presenting a defined syndrome, it is often associated with infertility, bleeding, and pain. The origin of this bone tissue has been interpreted as sequelae of early abortion, with no basis other than the statistical association between the two conditions. However, recent studies based on genetic identification techniques of DNA allow reinterpreting the phenomenon and establish that endometrial bone metaplasia originates from the patient’s stem cells lying in the endometrium. Diagnosis is based on ultrasound detection and subsequent confirmation by hysteroscopy, which usually shows excellent clinical results with more than 70% of cases of regaining fertility.

Keywords

Hysteroscopy Endometrial osseous metaplasia Intrauterine bone 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Enric Cayuela
    • 1
  • Josep Vilanova
    • 2
  • María del Río
    • 1
  • Federico Heredia
    • 1
  • Laura Acín
    • 1
  • Patricia Zarco
    • 1
  • Natalia Giraldo
    • 1
  • Estefania Llanos
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hospital General Universitari de l’HospitaletConsorci Sanitari IntegralBarcelonaSpain
  2. 2.Department of AnatomyUniversity of BarcelonaBarcelonaSpain

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