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Did the Initial State of Reality Begin to Exist Uncaused?

  • Andrew Ter Ern LokeEmail author
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Part of the Palgrave Frontiers in Philosophy of Religion book series (PFPR)

Abstract

I explain that scepticism concerning the universal applicability of the Causal Principle due to considerations of quantum physics is unwarranted. In response to Oppy (Faith and Philosophy 27:61–71, 2010, 2015), I develop an argument for the Causal Principle which shows that, if the initial state of reality began to exist uncaused, then certain events would begin to exist uncaused around us, which is not the case. Therefore, the antecedent is not the case. I explain that my argument does not presuppose the dynamic theory of time, and it does not rule out libertarian free choice, for on agent-causal theories one can understand libertarian free choices as indeterministic but not uncaused.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Hong KongHong KongHong Kong

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