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Geriatric Cerebrovascular Injury

  • Peter B. Letarte
Chapter

Abstract

The incidence and prevalence of cerebrovascular disease increase with age. Acute care surgeons are sure to encounter this set of diseases when treating the emergently sick and injured in this age group. Cerebrovascular disease often presents in isolation, with elderly patient who awakens with a new set of neuro-deficits or presents after a collapse with new associated neuro-deficits. Often these presentations are masked by other entities, such as the patient who suffers from spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage while driving or the patient who has a stroke and falls while intoxicated. The acute care surgeon must be able to discern the presence of cerebrovascular disease within the patient’s presenting symptom complex and then rapidly incorporate the oftentimes limited care the patient requires into the patient’s care plan.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.NeurosurgeonPremier HealthDaytonUSA

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