The Academic SDI—Towards Understanding Spatial Data Infrastructures for Research and Education

  • Serena Coetzee
  • Stefan Steiniger
  • Barend Köbben
  • Adam Iwaniak
  • Iwona Kaczmarek
  • Petr Rapant
  • Antony Cooper
  • Franz-Josef Behr
  • Govert Schoof
  • Samy Katumba
  • Rumiana Vatseva
  • Kisco Sinvula
  • Harold Moellering
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography book series (LNGC)

Abstract

The demand for geospatial data across different disciplines and organisations has led to the development and implementation of spatial data infrastructures (SDI) and the theory and concepts behind them. An SDI is an evolving concept about facilitating and coordinating the exchange of geospatial data and services between stakeholders from different levels in the spatial data community. Universities and other research organisations typically have well-established libraries and digital catalogues for scientific literature, but catalogues for geospatial data are rare. Geospatial data is widely used in research, but geospatial data produced by researchers is seldom available, accessible and usable, e.g., for purposes of teaching or further research after completion of the project. This chapter describes the experiences of a number of SDI implementations at universities and research institutes. Based on this, the Academic SDI, an SDI for research and education, is defined and its stakeholders are described. The purpose, scope and stakeholders of the Academic SDI are described based on the formal model of an SDI developed by the International Cartographic Association (ICA) Commission on SDIs and Standards (formerly the Commission on Geoinformation Infrastructures and Standards). The results contribute to understanding the state-of-the-art in SDI implementations at universities and research institutes; how the Academic SDI differs from a ‘regular’ SDI; and which role players need to be involved in a successful SDI implementation for research and education.

Keywords

Spatial data infrastructure SDI University Research Education Stakeholder 

References

  1. Bernard, L., Mäs, S., Müller, M., Henzen, C., & Brauner, J. (2014). Scientific geodata infrastructures: Challenges, approaches and directions. International Journal of Digital Earth, 7(7), 613–633.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Coetzee, S., Steiniger, S., Köbben, B., Iwaniak, A., Kaczmarek, I., Rapant, P., et al. (2017). SDI implementations at universities and research institutes. Retrieved January 21, 2017, from http://sdistandards.icaci.org/resources/.
  3. Cooper, A. K., Moellering, H., Hjelmager, J., Rapant, P., Delgado, T., Laurent, D., et al. (2012). A spatial data infrastructure model from the computational viewpoint. International Journal of Geographical Information Science, 27(6), 1133–1151.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Cooper, A. K., Rapant, P., Hjelmager, J., Laurent, D., Iwaniak, A., Coetzee, S., et al. (2011). Extending the formal model of a spatial data infrastructure to include volunteered geographical information. In 25th International Cartographic Conference (ICC). Paris, France.Google Scholar
  5. Crompvoets, J., Bregt, A., Rajabifard, A., & Williamson, I. (2004). Assessing the worldwide developments of national spatial data clearinghouses. International Journal of Geographical Information Science, 18, 665–690.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Dodsworth, E. H., &, Nicholson A. (2015). Using google earth in libraries: A practical guide for librarians. rowman and littlefield.Google Scholar
  7. Haggett P. (2001). Geography: A global synthesis. Longman.Google Scholar
  8. Harvard Geospatial Library (2016). Welcome to the Harvard Geospatial Library. Retrieved January 21, 2017, from http://calvert.hul.harvard.edu:8080/opengeoportal/.
  9. Hjelmager, J., Moellering, H., Cooper, A., et al. (2008). An initial formal model for spatial data infrastructures. International Journal of Geographical Information Science, 22(11–12), 1295–1309.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Hootsmans, R., Huurneman, G., Lemmens, R., & Paresi, R (1999). Provisional plan for common database project (CDP). Internal report, ITC. Retrieved February 10, 2017, from http://kartoweb.itc.nl/kobben/publications/ProvisionalPlanforCommonDatabaseProject.pdf.
  11. Köbben, B., de By, R., Foerster, T., Huisman, O., Lemmens, R., & Morales, J. (2010). Using the SDIlight approach in teaching a Geoinformatics master. Transactions in GIS, 14(s1), 25–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Medyckyj-Scott, D., Sutton, E., Higgins, C., & Heywood I. (2011). The European National Mapping and Cadastral Agencies and Higher Education A Market for Geospatial Information—Myth or Reality.Google Scholar
  13. Michigan State University Libraries (2016). GIS data: Worldwide data. Retrieved January 21, 2017, from http://libguides.lib.msu.edu/gisdata.
  14. MIT Libraries (2016). Geographic information systems (GIS): General data for the world. Retrieved January 21, 2017, from http://libguides.mit.edu/c.php?g=176295&p=1161383.
  15. Nature (2016). Policies: Availability of data, materials and methods. http://www.nature.com/authors/policies/availability.html. Retrieved21 Jan 2017.
  16. OGC (2010). OpenGIS web map server interface implementation specification revision 1.0.0. Technical report 00–028, Open Geospatial Consortium.Google Scholar
  17. Ouellet, M. and Biondo, S. (2012). An open and powerful GIS data discovery engine. In Proceedings OGRS 2012. Retrieved October 24, 2016, from http://www.ogrs-community.org/proceedings/2012_proceedings/ogrs2012_symposium_proceedings.pdf.
  18. Pauknerova, E., Horakova, B., & Ruzicka J. (2002). metainformation database system MIDAS as an On-Line Catalogue of Geodata of Public Administration in the transformation process. In 8th EC-GI and GIS WORKSHOP, ESDI—A Work in Progress, Dublin, Ireland July 3–5, 2002. Retrieved February 10, 2017, from http://www.ec-gis.org/Workshops/8ec-gis/cd/presentations/3_sp_ep.pdf.
  19. Rajabifard, A., & Williamson, I. P. (2001). Spatial data infrastructures: Concept, SDI hierarchy and future directions. In: Proceedings of Geomatics ’80. Tehran, Iran.Google Scholar
  20. Rey, S. J. (2014). Open regional science. The Annals of Regional Science, 52(3), 825–837.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Sagaris, L. (2014). Citizen participation for sustainable transport: The case of ‘Living City’ in Santiago, Chile (1997–2012). Journal of Transport Geography, 41, 74–83.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Saxon State and University Library (2016). The map collection. Retrieved October 20, 2016, from https://www.slub-dresden.de/en/collections/maps/the-map-collection.
  23. Sinvula, K. M., Coetzee, S., Cooper, A. K., Owusu-Banahene, W., Nangolo, et al. (2017). A comparative analysis of stakeholder roles in the spatial data infrastructures of South Africa, Namibia and Ghana. Submitted paper, International Journal of Spatial Data Infrastructures Research.Google Scholar
  24. Stanford University Libraries. (2016). Data. Retrieved January 21, 2017, from https://library.stanford.edu/research/stanford-geospatial-center/data.

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Serena Coetzee
    • 1
  • Stefan Steiniger
    • 2
  • Barend Köbben
    • 3
  • Adam Iwaniak
    • 4
  • Iwona Kaczmarek
    • 4
  • Petr Rapant
    • 5
  • Antony Cooper
    • 1
    • 6
  • Franz-Josef Behr
    • 7
  • Govert Schoof
    • 8
  • Samy Katumba
    • 9
  • Rumiana Vatseva
    • 10
  • Kisco Sinvula
    • 1
  • Harold Moellering
    • 11
  1. 1.Department of Geography, Geoinformatics and MeteorologyCentre for Geoinformation Science, University of PretoriaPretoriaSouth Africa
  2. 2.CEDEUS & Department of Transportation & LogisticsPontifical Catholic University of ChileSantiago de ChileChile
  3. 3.ITC—University of TwenteEnschedeNetherlands
  4. 4.Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life SciencesWroclawPoland
  5. 5.Institute of GeoinformaticsFaculty of Mining and Geology, VSB—Technical University of OstravaOstravaCzechia
  6. 6.CSIR Built EnvironmentPretoriaSouth Africa
  7. 7.Stuttgart University of Applied SciencesStuttgartGermany
  8. 8.GIS Centrum Voor Informatie TechnologieRijksuniversiteit GroningenGroningenNetherlands
  9. 9.Gauteng City-Region Observatory, A Partnership of University of Johannesburg, University of The Witwatersrand (Johannesburg), Gauteng Provincial Government and Organised Local Government in GautengJohannesburgSouth Africa
  10. 10.National Institute of Geophysics, Geodesy and Geography, Bulgarian Academy of SciencesSofiaBulgaria
  11. 11.Harold Moellering, Department of GeographyOhio State UniversityColumbusUSA

Personalised recommendations